Giving attention to an introvert child

Discussion in 'Parenting' started by Alexandoy, Mar 22, 2020.

  1. Alexandoy

    Alexandoy Active Member

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    I have noticed my parents were fair in the attention that they give to their 6 children. But I admit that I am an introvert so I probably don't need much of their attention since I can do things my way especially when I reached high school age. But that was also the time that I realized I had been doing some things wrongly. In short, I needed more attention from my parents to give me guidance that I cannot get from somebody else.
     
  2. Hova

    Hova Member

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    Introverts need guidance too. I know expressing oneself doesn't come that easy to introverts like it does with extroverts. So knowing when an introvert needs help is next to impossible. The best approach is to always engage, and that way they will know you as parents are always there, no matter what.
     
  3. Jason

    Jason Member

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    No. You dont. If you are an introvert, like me. We derived strength from being alone, quite and doing things in our own way. Never ever think that it could have been any better.

    Find ways of making those around you understand that you are an introvert and that they should learn to handle it that way.
     
  4. doursay

    doursay New Member

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    I was introverted as a child and I remember needing only minimal interaction with my parents. You need some, but a good parent will recognize that introverted children don't need or want as much attention as other children. Parents that are too pushy or simply not there, both approaches because they are trying to connect in some way, will be remembered by the child.

    As a parent, learn the boundaries the child sets and accommodate them the best you can. When a child is sick, that's a different story. But with normal day-to-day living, learn to read your child in terms of this.
     
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